Carrot Tzimmes

Leora_Copeland Recipe, Side Dishes, Vegetarian Atlas Leave a Comment

What I've Learned So Far


For this week's recipe we head to Mid-East for an Israeli inspired dish. Carrot Tzimmes is a traditional Jewish dish, often served during Rosh Hashanah, when it's tradition to eat sweet and honey-flavored dishes.
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Tzimmes, tsimmes, and other spelling variants are typically made from carrots and dried fruits such as prunes or raisins, often combined with other root vegetables (including yam). This is not a quick dish to make - while the prep time doesn't too long, it's at two hours of cooking time.
I really like to eat this for breakfast, with a side dish of plain, low-fat Greek yogurt. As with most recipes, if something sounds good - try adding it to the finished dish. For this one, it could be raisins, walnuts, or cinnamon.

The Recipe


You'll Need:

• 1/4 C uncooked barley

• 5 C carrots, cut into rounds

• 1 C grated apple

• 2 Tbl honey

• 1 1/2 Tbl butter

• 2 1/2 tsp powdered ginger

• Pinch of salt

Do This:

1. Bring barley and 1 C water to a boil in a covered pot. Turn off heat, let set 1 hour, and then drain.

2. Add remaining ingredients, plus 1/2 - 3/4 C water to the pot.

3. Place on low heat, cover, and cook at least 1 hour until barley is tender. Stir occasionally and add more water if Tzimmes dries out.


Recipe Notes


• Five cups of carrots is really about 3-4 large carrots. The reason I have so many in the picture is for when I burn the crap out of the first batch because I'm not paying enough attention and the water boils dry.

• The thickness of the carrots will determine how soft they get during cooking. If you slide them thinly, they'll get pretty soft. If you slice them about an inch thick, they won't get as soft.

• I cannot stress enough how much I love my Salad Shooter - particularly for recipes like this. I can use it both to slice the carrots and to grate the apple.

• If you get to the end of the hour of cooking time, and it seems like there's too much water, just uncover the Tzimmes and let it continue to simmer - the liquid will boil off. Just be sure to keep an eye on it so it doesn't burn.

• The barley will continue to absorb liquid after you're done cooking - even during storage - so the dish will probably have a different consistency if you're eating it leftover.

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